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January 2, 2013     Montmorency County Tribune
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-- Canada Creek Ranch by Borboro Ann Steele Happy New Year, everyone! We had some sunshine last week, which melted the icy snow off power and Internet lines. Some members were without power and internet for five days. The fortunate ones used their gas generators. Even though the outages were inconvenient we salute the PIE&G crews for getting the power back on while working in horrible conditions An eReader class will be held at the Atlanta Library Tues- day, Jan. 22 at 6 p.m. Learn to borrowlibrary books on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, or Android tablet. Cost is $10. Call 785- 3941 to register. Events coming up are CCR's Trek and Trail Treats, Sat, Jan. 19; Amateur sled dog races at Clear Lake Park Day Use Area, Saturday-Sun., Jan. 19-20; Sno*Drift Rally, Friday-Sat., Jan. 25-26. We wish a happy birthday to Carol Homing, Jan. 3 and Chuck Whitmire Jr., Jan. 5 We wish a happy anniversary to Tom and Lorna Tarman, Jan. 2; Ron and Deb Vendlinski, Jan. 7. Did you know that on Jan.I, 1892, New Year's Day, Ellis Island was opened? Over the years more than 20 million individuals were processed through the stations. The island was used as a point of deportation as well: in 1932 alone, 20,000 people were deported from Ellis Island. When the US entered WWII in 1941, Ellis Island became a Coast Guard Station. It closed Nov. 12,1954, and was declared a national parkin 1956. After years of disuse itwas restored and in 1990 reopened as a museum. (Chase's Calendar of Events) If you have any news for this article, please contact me by Wednesday evening the week before you want to see it in the paper. Contact me at one of the following: 989-785- 4865, 8424 Brown Trail, Atlanta M149709 or send email to basteeleccr@hughes.net. Can't find anything to write on? Get some scratch pads at the Tribune. One dollar plus tax will get you three! I Wednesday, January 2, 2013 The Montmorency County Tribune 5 othetales of 1 " up t Recollections of my grandfather, Sylvester S. King, as I remember by Douglas A. King To me he always seemed tall. He had a hearty laugh, wore bib overalls, a waist-type denim work jacket, and a summer railroad cap. In the winter he wore a heavy cap, which I learned in later life was a Kroemer Cap intro- duced in the Upper Peninsula for rail- road workers. He farmed eighty acres of land four and one-half miles north of Lewiston and was an excellent horseman who took great pride in plowing fields. The furrows that he made were always uniform and straight. He raised cattle, Durham's I believe, along with Chesapeake hogs and leghorn chickens. He had a dog, Tricksie, and a cat he called Prince Henry. PART III On Nov. 14, 1939, a rainy evening, while trying to get his livestock headed to the barn for the night, he lost his balance, fell and could not get up. He had a shrill whistle, which he accom- plished by putting his index finger and thumb into his mouth and blowing. This attracted the attention of some hunters who notified my parents that someone was calling for help. My Dad went up and got him, took him home and tucked him in for the night. His health had been failing with dropsy and a continuing heart problem. Ar- rangements were made, and shortly after his fall he came to live with us. A bed was put up in the south end of our farm house, and a new way of life evolved. He had a Model-A Ford that was a bright blue. He wanted to go up to his house for something, and my mother sent me along for some reason or an- other. We got to the gate, which I was going to open for him. I don't know what went wrong, but I guess that the transition from a Model-T Ford to a Model-A was substantial because when we finally got stopped he had knocked down the post from which the gate would swing open. We man- aged to get it open, cobbled it up, and eventually got home without any fur- ther incidents. I believe it was the last Thursday Nite Mixed Amtic Cats .......... 7-0 Cast Offs ........... 5-2 Misfits ............. 5-2 3 Dark 1 Lite ........ 5-2 3 Rights & A Wrong ... 2-5 Not a Clue .......... 2-5 Timbertown Lanes ..... 2-5 Team high game, Timbertown Lanes, 978; team high sedes, Acrtic Cats, 2767; men's high game and series, Jerry Keyser, 257-714; women's high game, Ann Omstead, 236; women's high series, Kim Wemer, 590 Sunday Night Mixed Loud Bowlers ...... 42-14 On Strike ......... 42-14 Crazy Eight ....... 31-25 It Could Happen .... 30-26 Party Crashers ..... 28-28 Challengers ....... 26-30 Low Rollers ....... 21-35 Team high game and series, On ONLY at the DIRTY ELK in Atlanta State Street, Atlanta, MI Adult Corner Romantic gifts, novelties, magazines d and DVD's time he drove. He decided he did not need chickens anymore, so he told my mother she could have them. First of all, she did not have enough room to house his chickens, and secondly, she did not like leghorns, so a decision was made to can the flock. My dad and I kid- napped the chickens and brought them home in gunny sacks. Hot water was boiling on the kitchen range when the massacre began. Dad and I were the executioners. I would get them out of the bag, he would chop their heads off, and I would pick up the carcasses and deliver them to the temporary butcher and canning factory set up in the kitchen. My mother and my sisters, Lyllis and Thelma, had the inglorious task of removing the feathers, cutting up the chickens, and stuffing the chicken parts into the canning jars to be cold packed. Cold packing was a process of pre- serving meats and other products by boiling the jars of the food processed for three and one half hours in a cop- per boiler on top of the wood range. If I remember right, it took all day for the project to be completed. It may have boiled over into the next day. All of his livestock and horses were sold to a cattle buyer, except for the Durham Bull which Grandpa sug- gested that my dad should have to improve the quality of his own herd. The bull was moved and placed in a stanchion on the east end of our barn. He was huge. Much to my dismay, I soon learned that in addition to my regular chores itwas myjob to provide water for the bull. This was not an easy task. The well was some 500 feet from the barn. An attempt, before my time, had been made to deliver water to the barn by gravity from the well. A flaw in engineering or a plumbing installation error had shut the system down when cold weather burst the pipes. This cre- ated the problem of my providing wa- ter for the bull. I had two sets of instruction about this procedure: one from Grandpa and the other from Dad. The instruction from Grandpa was to not give the bull Strike, 692-1885; men's high game and series, John Gibson, 207 -601; women's high game, Pat Neff, 201; women's high series, Tracey Hartwell, 531. Lewiston Gang Seagulls .......... 78-34 Hawks ........... 64-48 Eagles ........... 62-50 Blue Jays ......... 61-51 Orioles ........... 54-58 Mourning Doves .... 50-62 Cardinals ......... 45-67 Robins ........... 34-78 Team high game and sedes, Seagulls, 777-2191; men's high game and series, Bill Pullen, 278-761; women's high game and series, Liz Hunt, 187-495. Friday Nite Men's K-N-K Excavating ..... 7-0 Talley's ............ 5-2 Twin Lakes Auto Repair. 5-2 Rogue ............. 2-5 Moose Lodge ........ 2-5 Lewiston Glass ....... 0-7 Team high game and series, Talley's, 1171-3313; men's high game, Ed Umstead, 278; men's high series, Kathie Parks, 716. DEAD BATTERIES CAN'T SAVE LIVES Change the batteries in your smoke de-'tor at leost once a year. United Smes Fke Mminio Fedal E m,ee'y/n0,men! //www.= Early Swingers 1 - Sircely Construction 2 - Gaylord Eye Care 3 - GBC High scratch game & series, Suzanne Sir(ely, 244-592; high handicap game, Suzanne Sir(ely, 271; high handicap series, Lynn Ernst, 687; high team game scratch, GBC, 847; high team series scratch, Spar- tan Sewer, 2427. Tag-a-Longs 1 - RCS 2 - Benjamin Bolser Art. 3 - Shakes N' Such High scratch game, Carla Carter, 207; high scratch se- ries, Lisa Bakker, 579; high handicap game and series, Paulette Johnson, 236-623; high team game scratch and series, Airway Automation, 843-2459. over one-half pail of water. Grandpa was of the firm belief that the bull did not need more because that was all it ever drank when he was still doing his own chores up on the hill. It must be pointed out that the bull was the only critter drinking from that huge tank, which we found out later, had a few rats and mice floating in it when we cleaned out the tank. These would have discouraged the bull from drink- ing any more than the bare necessity. By the time I assumed my duties of watering the bull, my dad had recog- nized the problem and told me to give the bull all the water he would drink. By this time snowwas on the ground so I brought the water to the barn in a five gallon cream can. I pushed it along on a sled. A piece of binder twine extend- ing from the steering section and looped over the top of the can enabled me to push the supply to the upstairs portion of the barn. I poured the con- tents from the can into a three and a half gallon bull pail which was de- signed for a critter with a big head. I soon learned it was also designed for a critter with a tremendous thirst. Five gallons of water was a drop in the bucket to that monster. He would stick his nose in that fresh, clear water and go slurp; the water was gone. Two trips generally completed the task. Any sur- plus was kept in the pail and hung up as a starter for the next watering. After chores at the supper table, the question would always be asked, "How much water did the bull drink, Laddie?" The answer I always gave back was, "One-half pail, Grandpa." Dad always gave me a nod and an approving smile The winter set in with lots of snow and sub-zero temperatures. Grandpa's health continuedto dete- riorate. There was a regimen he fol- lowed after supper. He would sit on the edge of his bed with his feet dangling down toward the floor. It seemed as though he took two handfuls of Epson salts, dry, and two tablespoons of cod liver oil. He washed this down by a heftydose ofSeagram's 7-Crownwhis- key from a water glass. The whiskey had been approved by Dr. Young, his physician, but I suspect there were two other rea- sons for the consumption: First, to wash away the after taste of the Epson salts and cod liver oil, and secondly, he liked the stuff in the "Little bottle with the big 7." I had heard many a tale of his experiences he had in his time in Africa. After he had finished his medical rou- tine, I would pull up a chair along side his bed and would ask him to tell me all about it. To be continued... Note: This is an excerpt from recollections of his grandfather originally penned by Doug King in 2002. REPORT DRUG SALES OR DEALING OFFERS TO HUNT: 1-800-573-DRUG (3784) Huron Undercover Narcotics Team -- Canada Creek Ranch by Borboro Ann Steele Happy New Year, everyone! We had some sunshine last week, which melted the icy snow off power and Internet lines. Some members were without power and internet for five days. The fortunate ones used their gas generators. Even though the outages were inconvenient we salute the PIE&G crews for getting the power back on while working in horrible conditions An eReader class will be held at the Atlanta Library Tues- day, Jan. 22 at 6 p.m. Learn to borrowlibrary books on your Kindle, Nook, iPad, or Android tablet. Cost is $10. Call 785- 3941 to register. Events coming up are CCR's Trek and Trail Treats, Sat, Jan. 19; Amateur sled dog races at Clear Lake Park Day Use Area, Saturday-Sun., Jan. 19-20; Sno*Drift Rally, Friday-Sat., Jan. 25-26. We wish a happy birthday to Carol Homing, Jan. 3 and Chuck Whitmire Jr., Jan. 5 We wish a happy anniversary to Tom and Lorna Tarman, Jan. 2; Ron and Deb Vendlinski, Jan. 7. Did you know that on Jan.I, 1892, New Year's Day, Ellis Island was opened? Over the years more than 20 million individuals were processed through the stations. The island was used as a point of deportation as well: in 1932 alone, 20,000 people were deported from Ellis Island. When the US entered WWII in 1941, Ellis Island became a Coast Guard Station. It closed Nov. 12,1954, and was declared a national parkin 1956. After years of disuse itwas restored and in 1990 reopened as a museum. (Chase's Calendar of Events) If you have any news for this article, please contact me by Wednesday evening the week before you want to see it in the paper. Contact me at one of the following: 989-785- 4865, 8424 Brown Trail, Atlanta M149709 or send email to basteeleccr@hughes.net. Can't find anything to write on? Get some scratch pads at the Tribune. One dollar plus tax will get you three! I Wednesday, January 2, 2013 The Montmorency County Tribune 5 othetales of 1 " up t Recollections of my grandfather, Sylvester S. King, as I remember by Douglas A. King To me he always seemed tall. He had a hearty laugh, wore bib overalls, a waist-type denim work jacket, and a summer railroad cap. In the winter he wore a heavy cap, which I learned in later life was a Kroemer Cap intro- duced in the Upper Peninsula for rail- road workers. He farmed eighty acres of land four and one-half miles north of Lewiston and was an excellent horseman who took great pride in plowing fields. The furrows that he made were always uniform and straight. He raised cattle, Durham's I believe, along with Chesapeake hogs and leghorn chickens. He had a dog, Tricksie, and a cat he called Prince Henry. PART III On Nov. 14, 1939, a rainy evening, while trying to get his livestock headed to the barn for the night, he lost his balance, fell and could not get up. He had a shrill whistle, which he accom- plished by putting his index finger and thumb into his mouth and blowing. This attracted the attention of some hunters who notified my parents that someone was calling for help. My Dad went up and got him, took him home and tucked him in for the night. His health had been failing with dropsy and a continuing heart problem. Ar- rangements were made, and shortly after his fall he came to live with us. A bed was put up in the south end of our farm house, and a new way of life evolved. He had a Model-A Ford that was a bright blue. He wanted to go up to his house for something, and my mother sent me along for some reason or an- other. We got to the gate, which I was going to open for him. I don't know what went wrong, but I guess that the transition from a Model-T Ford to a Model-A was substantial because when we finally got stopped he had knocked down the post from which the gate would swing open. We man- aged to get it open, cobbled it up, and eventually got home without any fur- ther incidents. I believe it was the last Thursday Nite Mixed Amtic Cats .......... 7-0 Cast Offs ........... 5-2 Misfits ............. 5-2 3 Dark 1 Lite ........ 5-2 3 Rights & A Wrong ... 2-5 Not a Clue .......... 2-5 Timbertown Lanes ..... 2-5 Team high game, Timbertown Lanes, 978; team high sedes, Acrtic Cats, 2767; men's high game and series, Jerry Keyser, 257-714; women's high game, Ann Omstead, 236; women's high series, Kim Wemer, 590 Sunday Night Mixed Loud Bowlers ...... 42-14 On Strike ......... 42-14 Crazy Eight ....... 31-25 It Could Happen .... 30-26 Party Crashers ..... 28-28 Challengers ....... 26-30 Low Rollers ....... 21-35 Team high game and series, On ONLY at the DIRTY ELK in Atlanta State Street, Atlanta, MI Adult Corner Romantic gifts, novelties, magazines d and DVD's time he drove. He decided he did not need chickens anymore, so he told my mother she could have them. First of all, she did not have enough room to house his chickens, and secondly, she did not like leghorns, so a decision was made to can the flock. My dad and I kid- napped the chickens and brought them home in gunny sacks. Hot water was boiling on the kitchen range when the massacre began. Dad and I were the executioners. I would get them out of the bag, he would chop their heads off, and I would pick up the carcasses and deliver them to the temporary butcher and canning factory set up in the kitchen. My mother and my sisters, Lyllis and Thelma, had the inglorious task of removing the feathers, cutting up the chickens, and stuffing the chicken parts into the canning jars to be cold packed. Cold packing was a process of pre- serving meats and other products by boiling the jars of the food processed for three and one half hours in a cop- per boiler on top of the wood range. If I remember right, it took all day for the project to be completed. It may have boiled over into the next day. All of his livestock and horses were sold to a cattle buyer, except for the Durham Bull which Grandpa sug- gested that my dad should have to improve the quality of his own herd. The bull was moved and placed in a stanchion on the east end of our barn. He was huge. Much to my dismay, I soon learned that in addition to my regular chores itwas myjob to provide water for the bull. This was not an easy task. The well was some 500 feet from the barn. An attempt, before my time, had been made to deliver water to the barn by gravity from the well. A flaw in engineering or a plumbing installation error had shut the system down when cold weather burst the pipes. This cre- ated the problem of my providing wa- ter for the bull. I had two sets of instruction about this procedure: one from Grandpa and the other from Dad. The instruction from Grandpa was to not give the bull Strike, 692-1885; men's high game and series, John Gibson, 207 -601; women's high game, Pat Neff, 201; women's high series, Tracey Hartwell, 531. Lewiston Gang Seagulls .......... 78-34 Hawks ........... 64-48 Eagles ........... 62-50 Blue Jays ......... 61-51 Orioles ........... 54-58 Mourning Doves .... 50-62 Cardinals ......... 45-67 Robins ........... 34-78 Team high game and sedes, Seagulls, 777-2191; men's high game and series, Bill Pullen, 278-761; women's high game and series, Liz Hunt, 187-495. Friday Nite Men's K-N-K Excavating ..... 7-0 Talley's ............ 5-2 Twin Lakes Auto Repair. 5-2 Rogue ............. 2-5 Moose Lodge ........ 2-5 Lewiston Glass ....... 0-7 Team high game and series, Talley's, 1171-3313; men's high game, Ed Umstead, 278; men's high series, Kathie Parks, 716. DEAD BATTERIES CAN'T SAVE LIVES Change the batteries in your smoke de-'tor at leost once a year. United Smes Fke Mminio Fedal E m,ee'y/n0,men! //www.= Early Swingers 1 - Sircely Construction 2 - Gaylord Eye Care 3 - GBC High scratch game & series, Suzanne Sir(ely, 244-592; high handicap game, Suzanne Sir(ely, 271; high handicap series, Lynn Ernst, 687; high team game scratch, GBC, 847; high team series scratch, Spar- tan Sewer, 2427. Tag-a-Longs 1 - RCS 2 - Benjamin Bolser Art. 3 - Shakes N' Such High scratch game, Carla Carter, 207; high scratch se- ries, Lisa Bakker, 579; high handicap game and series, Paulette Johnson, 236-623; high team game scratch and series, Airway Automation, 843-2459. over one-half pail of water. Grandpa was of the firm belief that the bull did not need more because that was all it ever drank when he was still doing his own chores up on the hill. It must be pointed out that the bull was the only critter drinking from that huge tank, which we found out later, had a few rats and mice floating in it when we cleaned out the tank. These would have discouraged the bull from drink- ing any more than the bare necessity. By the time I assumed my duties of watering the bull, my dad had recog- nized the problem and told me to give the bull all the water he would drink. By this time snowwas on the ground so I brought the water to the barn in a five gallon cream can. I pushed it along on a sled. A piece of binder twine extend- ing from the steering section and looped over the top of the can enabled me to push the supply to the upstairs portion of the barn. I poured the con- tents from the can into a three and a half gallon bull pail which was de- signed for a critter with a big head. I soon learned it was also designed for a critter with a tremendous thirst. Five gallons of water was a drop in the bucket to that monster. He would stick his nose in that fresh, clear water and go slurp; the water was gone. Two trips generally completed the task. Any sur- plus was kept in the pail and hung up as a starter for the next watering. After chores at the supper table, the question would always be asked, "How much water did the bull drink, Laddie?" The answer I always gave back was, "One-half pail, Grandpa." Dad always gave me a nod and an approving smile The winter set in with lots of snow and sub-zero temperatures. Grandpa's health continuedto dete- riorate. There was a regimen he fol- lowed after supper. He would sit on the edge of his bed with his feet dangling down toward the floor. It seemed as though he took two handfuls of Epson salts, dry, and two tablespoons of cod liver oil. He washed this down by a heftydose ofSeagram's 7-Crownwhis- key from a water glass. The whiskey had been approved by Dr. Young, his physician, but I suspect there were two other rea- sons for the consumption: First, to wash away the after taste of the Epson salts and cod liver oil, and secondly, he liked the stuff in the "Little bottle with the big 7." I had heard many a tale of his experiences he had in his time in Africa. After he had finished his medical rou- tine, I would pull up a chair along side his bed and would ask him to tell me all about it. To be continued... Note: This is an excerpt from recollections of his grandfather originally penned by Doug King in 2002. REPORT DRUG SALES OR DEALING OFFERS TO HUNT: 1-800-573-DRUG (3784) Huron Undercover Narcotics Team